SONY Alpha Tutorials For Beginners – Yuin Yin Light Gothic Studio Shoot

Few weeks back, we Alpharians (Alphanatics) did another private photoshoot session with another friend, Yuin Yin as our model..

The theme was Light Gothic, as suggested by the model herself..She was inspired by the manga cum anime and even a live-action movie adaptation called Nana..

Nana Osaki, the protagonist in the manga, is a vocalist for for a goth rock band called Black Stones and the character is played by Japanese singer Mika Nakashima in the live-action movie..

Okay enough of fun facts..We used the studio in SONY Style, a SONY sales department shop in The Curve which has its own studio..

A white backdrop has been used to create a contrast with the model’s outfit of dark and gloomy theme, the goth..

In this entry, I’ll explain more on how I got the photos and how I set the settings in my camera as well as a bit of fun facts here and there for the beginners..

Also, it’s a bit of introduction to the SONY Style Studio, which in this photoshoot was the second time we’ve used it..

So without further ado, here’s the photos and a bit of story-telling..

By the way, most of the photos I’ve already post-processed (PP) aka photoshop on the curves and levels to sharpen its image..

yuin yin light gothic studio photoshoot
*#1*

This photo is shot at aperture of F5, shutter speed of 1/20″ but with ISO 800..

With the help of studio lights and studio flash the noise is not that visible to the naked eyes..

Of course, with a slight bit of post-processing (PP) on the curves and levels to get this photo..

yuin yin light gothic studio photoshoot
*#2*

This photo it seems like I’ve cut-off the background but it’s not..Like I said, the backdrop is white color so by lowering the shutter speed and with the help of high ISO, the white areas will become more white..

In photography term we usually call it over exposed or in other words, burned, pecah, bao kong (broken light), or anything else that sound similar to it..

This photo used almost same setting as photo #1, shutter speed at 1/20″ but F4.5, ISO 800..Slight post-processing (PP) to sharpen the image as well..

yuin yin light gothic studio photoshoot
*#3*

Some beginners might ask how to get the blurry effect just like the photo above..It’s very easy..The way to do it is just like compact camera’s macro mode..

In compact camera, by switching on macro mode, you just have to do a close up shoot and you’ll get the blurry effect..

In DSLR way, just zoom-in your lens and focus on one point on a close-up range..If you focus on the front part you will get the blurry effect on the back and vice-versa..

The blurry part in photography term is called bokeh, which actually is a Japanese word..

yuin yin light gothic studio photoshoot
*#4*

Another bokeh effect..Usually to get the bokeh effect, any range further than 35mm will create the bokeh effect depending on your focus point and your close-up range..

yuin yin light gothic studio photoshoot sony dslr alphanatics
*#5 – Emo-fied*

The original photo is quite bland and not as sharp..As usual, a bit of post-processing on the curves to increase its brightness and lower the levels to increase its contrast..

The settings for the photo above is 1/6″ for shutter speed and aperture at F5.6..Focal length is at full 70mm on my kitlens for this close up photo..

Of course, with the Super Steady Shot (SSS), an Image Stabilizer function which is built-in in a SONY Alpha DSLR camera body, the chances of getting blurry photos are lesser as well, even at low shutter speed..

yuin yin light gothic studio photoshoot sony alphanatics
*Photographers at work..Kevin, Wingz, Alvan, and Ethan*

Other than the two studio lights that you can see, we also use SONY flash guns, those big flash lights that you usually saw attached to the camera body..

All of the photos above, none of the studio flash nor SONY flash guns were used..

More simple tutorials for beginners when you read on..

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Sony A200 DSLR Test – ISO Performance

Ever since I bought my camera, SONY A200 DSLR on 9th May 2009, I’ve shot nearly 8,000 photos, or I should say used up 8,000 shutter count in 4 months..

From that amount of photos, I have a lot of bad photos that includes blurry photos, white balance testing photos, and also shutter speed testing photos..

From those tests, I’ve never thought of doing a performance test on my camera..

So from now on, I’m going to do some performance test with it as a guidance for myself and anyone who wants to explore in SONY Alpha DSLRs, or just plain DSLR..

It is strictly warned that it’s just a very brief guide to DSLR noobs and those trying to get their hands on a DSLR as based on my knowledge ..

I would not say it’s a tutorial as I’m not qualified enough for a tutorial..It’s just a simple test on my camera..

My SONY A200, equipped with its kitlens, a SONY 18-70mm, is sufficient enough for beginners like me, but I’m looking forward to expand my lens range already, after shooting for 4 months..

First off, I’ll test the most basic and easiest performance of all, the ISO sensitivity..

ISO actually stands for International Organization for Standardization, yes, it’s the usual ISO that we commonly know of, such ISO 9001, ISO 9002, etc etc..

As for camera’s light sensitivity, it is based on ISO 5800 for measuring the speed of color negative film..

Okay, enough of geek facts..Let’s get down to real business of SONY A200 ISO performance test..

sony a200 dslr iso-100 test
*ISO 100*

From here you can see the photo is considerably sharp as I’ve cropped it from its original size of 3872 x 2592, a full size of from the 10.2 megapixels body..

As you know, low ISO only works with good lighting and I took this pic with -0.3 BV (brightness value), shutter speed at 0.6 second, and F5.6 at 40mm focal length..

sony a200 dslr iso-200 test
*ISO 200*

When I pumped up the ISO to 200, the photo seems a bit grainy (noise) already but it’s still okay when you are in low light condition..

Aperture stays at F5.6, focal length 40mm, -0.3 BV, and shutter speed 1/3 second..

More on ISO 400 and above..

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